TEMPLE OF ARTEMIS

TEMPLE OF ARTEMIS

Temple of Artemis (Roman: Diana) – one of the Seven Wonders of the Ancient World, once stood 137 m x 69 m with over 127 marble pillars each 18 m high. The temple earned the city the title Servant of the Goddess. Pliny tells us that the magnificent structure took 120 years to build but is now represented only by one inconspicuous column, revealed during an archaeological excavation by the British Museum in the 1870s. Some fragments of the frieze and other small finds were removed – some to London and some to the Archaeological Museum in Istanbul.

The Temple of Artemis was rebuilt seven times over ten centuries although the exact number is uncertain. Excavations have revealed evidence that it has been rebuilt at least three times. 

The first sanctuary (temenos) antedated the Ionic immigration by many years, and dates to the Bronze Age. Callimachus, in his Hymn to Artemis, attributed it to the Amazons. In the 7th century BC, the old temple was destroyed by a flood. Its reconstruction began around 550 BC under the Cretan architect Chersiphron and his son Metagenes, at the expense of Croesus of Lydia: the project took 10 years to complete. The temple was destroyed in 356 BC by an act of arson and was again rebuilt, this time as the Wonder.

     Miniaturk Museum in Istanbul, Model of the Temple of Artemis

Antipater of Sidon, who compiled the list of the Seven Wonders, describes the finished temple: 
I have set eyes on the wall of lofty Babylon on which is a road for chariots, and the statue of Zeus by the Alpheus, and the hanging gardens, and the colossus of the Sun, and the huge labour of the high pyramids, and the vast tomb of Mausolus; but when I saw the house of Artemis that mounted to the clouds, those other marvels lost their brilliancy, and I said, Lo, apart from Olympus, the Sun never looked on aught so grand.

In Greek and Roman historical tradition, the temple's destruction coincided with the birth of Alexander the Great.
Alexander offered to pay for the temple's rebuilding; the Ephesians tactfully refused, and eventually rebuilt it after his death, at their own expense. Work started in 323 BC and continued for many years. The third temple was larger than the second; 137 m long by 69 m wide and 18 m high, with more than 127 columns. Athenagoras of Athens names Endoeus, a pupil of Daedalus, as sculptor of Artemis' main cult image.  

This reconstruction survived for 600 years, and appeared multiple times in early Christian accounts of Ephesus. According to the New Testament, the appearance of the first Christian missionary in Ephesus caused locals to fear for the temple's dishonour. The 2nd century Acts of John includes an apocryphal tale of the temple's destruction: the apostle John prayed publicly in the Temple of Artemis, exorcising its demons and of a sudden the altar of Artemis split in many pieces... and half the temple fell down, instantly converting the Ephesians, who wept, prayed or took flight.

Against this, a Roman edict of 162 AD acknowledges the importance of Artemesion, the annual Ephesian festival to Artemis, and officially extends it from a few holy days over March–April to a whole month, one of the largest and most magnificent religious festivals in Ephesus' liturgical calendar.

In 268 AD, the Temple was destroyed or damaged in a raid by the Goths, an East Germanic tribe.

Today the site of the temple is marked by a single column constructed of dissociated fragments discovered on the site during the excavations of 1869-1874 & 1904-1906. 

 

Main Historical Sites & Destinations Around Izmir & Kusadasi 

♦ The Archaeological Museum of Izmir exhibits an impressive collection of pre-Roman and Roman artefacts recovered from area
excavations, including Bergama, Iasos, Bayrakli and Izmir's Agora… more
♦ Ephesus Open Air Museum - contains the largest collection of Roman ruins in the eastern Mediterranean. Only an estimated 15% has been excavated… more
 Ephesus Archaeological Museum was reopened in November 2014 after extensive renovations. It houses finds from the nearby
Ephesus excavation site… more

♦ Basilica of St. John was built in the 6th century AD, under emperor Justinian I, over the supposed site of the apostle's tomb. It was
modelled after the now lost Church of the Holy Apostles in Constantinople… more
♦ Temple of Artemis – one of the Seven Wonders of the Ancient World, once stood 137 m x 69 m with 127 marble pillars each 18 m
high. The temple earned the city the title Servant of the Goddess… more
♦ The House of Virgin MaryLocated on the top of Nightingale mountain, the House of the Virgin Mary
Turkish: Meryemana), is located in a nature park between Ephesus and Seljuk, and is believed to be the last residence of the Virgin Mary, mother of Jesus. The peaceful site is sacred to both Christians and Muslims, and is visited by many tourists and pilgrims… more
♦ Village of Sirince
Once known as Kirkince, the village was built by the Greeks around 800 years ago and since the population
exchange in 1924 has since been inhabited by Muslims from Thessalonica. Indeed its habitants gave this name on purpose as they did
not want to be bothered by foreigners not to share the beauty of their village
.… more 
♦ The Site of Ancient Pergamum – City of Science & Satan…? Perched atop a windswept mountain along the Turkish coastline and gazing proudly over the azure Aegean Sea... more
♦ Didyma - Priene - Miletus - the three towns of Priene, Miletus, and Didyma make up part of Ancient Ionia, homeland of many of the ancient world’s greatest artistic and scientific minds, and each endowed with haunting ruins... more
♦ Pamukkale & Ancient Hierapolis
Deriving from springs in a cliff almost 200 m high overlooking the plain of Curuksu in south-west
Turkey, calcite-laden waters have created an unreal landscape, made up of mineral forests, petrified waterfalls and a series of terraced
basins given the name of Pamukkale (Cotton Palace)
... more
♦ Aphrodisias 
is one of the oldest sacred sites in Turkey. The site has been sacred since as early as 5.800 BC, when Neolithic farmers
came here to worship the Mother Goddess of fertility and crops
... more 

 


Kaktüs Tourism Travel Agency - Pera Air and Tourism
Cumhuriyet Mah. Nakiye Elgün Sok. No: 22 Osmanbey Apt. D.1 Şişli 34380 Istanbul / Turkey
Phone : 0 212 241 05 66 (pbx) Fax : 0 212 241 72 88
info@peraair.com | Operation License : A - 2713
Designed and Coded by INFOTEKNIK